17th Century Anatomical Striptease: Guest Post by Morbid Anatomy

Tab VI

Another series of most wonderful and enigmatic anatomical illustrations in the New York Academy of Medicine historical library collections are to be found in De humani corporis fabrica libri decem, tabulis XCIIX aeri incisis … exornati … Opus posthumum and Tabulae anatomicae (Venice, 1627) by Adriaan van de Spiegel (1578–1625), Giulio Cesare Casserio (1533–1616), and Daniel Bucretius (d. 1631). In this complex effort, van de Spiegel produced the text; Casserio commissioned the plates (for his own unrealized work); and the whole was published through the editorial offices of Bucretius, after both van de Spiegel and Casserio had died.

Tab XVI

These illustrations are described beautifully by Michael Sappol in the exhibition text for his National Library of Medicine exhibition  “Dream Anatomy” where he placed them under the header “Show-off Cadavers” and described them thusly:

The emergence of anatomical illustration in the period 1500-1750 coincided with a larger phenomenon, a new definition of personhood that was performed at court, in salons, coffeehouses, country estates, theaters, marketplaces, and at court. Inevitably anatomists took up, commented on, and played with, the contemporary obsession with self-fashioning and individuality—it was an era of manners, wit, foppishness, and coquetry. In the works of Giulio Casserio, John Browne and Pietro da Cortona, the illustrated anatomy book is a stage featuring posing, prancing cadavers. Animated with an exuberant vitality, the corpses perform an anatomical show for the reader’s gaze.

The images in this post are from the Tabulae anatomicae and show the anatomized body engaging in a sort of exuberant anatomical striptease. All images are drawn from the National Library of Medicine’s brilliant online exhibition Dream Anatomy; click on the exhibition name to see more!

Tab XV

Michael Sappol will be both speaking and screening films from the National Library of Medicine as part of the October 5th NYAM Festival of Medical History & the Arts; more on that here. Hope very much to see you there!

This post was written by Joanna Ebenstein of the Morbid Anatomy blog, library and event series; click here to find out more.

3 thoughts on “17th Century Anatomical Striptease: Guest Post by Morbid Anatomy

  1. These images are just fascinating! They remind me a bit of the plastinations in Body Worlds exhibits. I saw that exhibit once in Munich, I believe, back in 2004. I was teaching Anatomy and Physiology and took my students (G.I.s stationed in Germany) on a field trip to see it. Some were enthralled, and some were put off by the realistic and sometimes fanciful poses of the dissected specimens.

  2. Thank you, we think they are too! It’s always interesting to see people’s reactions to these sorts of things–they inspire some strong reactions, either way.

  3. Pingback: Linkurile zilei. Lecturi de citit (miercuri) - Dan PopaDan Popa

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